Twin Perspectives: Episode Five

November 7, 2017

Our podcast reaches its fifth week and with it, takes a personal turn. Delving into the uniquely irrational, worrisome and at times – baffling – world of our minds, we spend this episode discussing our own struggles with mental health, and share with you the kaleidoscope of techniques that we use to help manage it.

The topic of mental health occupies a hesitant place within the online world – it’s a little unsure of where it belongs. Talk about it too much, and you may just be accused of attention seeking. Talk about it too little, and you may find yourself responsible for perpetuating the uncomfortable stigmas surrounding it. Having already touched upon our own experiences of anxiety and depression throughout our blog, we therefore decided to brave any accusations of acting the drama queen(s), and speak as openly and honestly about this colourful, testing and at times – laughable – subject.

We genuinely hope our toolkit of advice is helpful, and that anyone experiencing their own battles with mental health is able to see it for what it is: a human, normal and common experience. It’s a topic too often talked about in lowered, hushed tones, but one we must also chat about whilst crying with laughter – recalling the time you tried to crawl across a shop floor, in a bid to elude a panic attack (or perhaps that was just me?)

Our mental health is a constantly fluctuating, changing and alternating state. Today, I may be that 1/4 suffering from a difficult time. However, it’s also likely that next week, you may be the one experiencing a tough time. Just like yesterday’s migraine will pass, you can be sure a bad time will ease, eventually.

Yes, experiencing crippling bouts of anxiety and depression is testing, horrid and at times, seemingly insurmountable – but it doesn’t have to equate to a miserable or lonely life. With the right tools, support and knowledge, your mental health issues need not be the terrifying, monsters you believe them to be – but simply shadow puppets. There’s no need to be scared, we promise.

 

References or notable mentions:

‘My Age of Anxiety’ – Scott Stossel

‘Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety’ – Daniel Smith

‘Furiously Happy’ – Jenny Lawson

‘The Happiness Trap’ – Russ Harris

‘Brain Maker’ – David Perlmutter

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